Home Management What Kind Of Lawyer Are You? 5 Questions To Ask Yourself Before Spending Marketing Dollars
What Kind Of Lawyer Are You?  5 Questions To Ask Yourself Before Spending Marketing Dollars
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What Kind Of Lawyer Are You? 5 Questions To Ask Yourself Before Spending Marketing Dollars

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Many attorneys wonder about the best thing they can do for their marketing – and there’s no shortage of suggestions for what lawyers can buy or do to help support their practices.

Yet, sometimes the answer to the most effective law firm marketing lies in re-examining the basics.

Before ever thinking about the bells and whistles, lawyers should thoroughly consider one very important aspect of marketing their law firm – and that’s determining what kind of law they’ll practice.

This fundamental element of having a successful practice is extremely valuable to lawyers – if your practice areas are too diverse, potential clients will struggle to know what you stand for. And that means that regardless of your marketing strategy, you may dilute your marketing message.

But determining what kind of lawyer you are without asking yourself some specific questions can be challenging.

Let’s look at three questions you may want to ask yourself before you figure out the next ad to buy, the best social media outlet to post on, the next marketing campaign you’ll email, or anything else that could involve your law firm’s finances.

 

Question 1: What type of law do I like practicing most?

It’s hard to sell something you don’t love. For most attorneys, the upside is that, typically, the thing we enjoy doing is also often the thing we do best. Excelling at – and enjoying – your primary area of practice makes it easy to market your services because you’re genuinely passionate about what you do. Being passionate about something not only makes it easier for you to market yourself, but that enthusiasm is contagious, and can make potential clients passionate about which law firm they choose. We live in a time where the ability to quickly retrieve, accurate answers is important to potential clients – and being passionate about what you do will make it that much easier for you to write high-quality content that answers the questions your potential clients have.

 

Question 2: What area of practice do I do best?

If the area you enjoy practicing most is the area of practice in which you do best, you’re in luck. But if you’re in a position in which you excel at a practice area you strongly dislike, then you may want to consider changing paths. Not only is it difficult to market your law firm if you dislike what you do, but it’s also vital to think about your quality of life: having a career that makes you unhappy shows, even if you’re great at the type of law you practice.

Changing directions – or eliminating practice areas – shouldn’t be something attorneys do in a rush. Shifting your law firm’s requires an appropriate amount of consideration. It’s vital to make the choices that will move your law firm in a positive direction, but it’s also important not to do things hastily or before you have enough data to make a decision.

For those in retirement range, changing paths may not be practical at this point in your career. One of the better marketing moves attorneys in this position may want to consider is finding a way to reignite your passion about your practice area.

 

Question 3: What practice area will give me best flow of potential new cases?

Being happy with what you do and good at what you do are valuable to having a successful career, but you’ll need a market that supports your practice area, too. If few people will have cases related to what you practice, it won’t matter how happy you are or how good you are at what you do. Divorce lawyers who set up shop where few divorces occur aren’t likely to have the kind of success they’re hoping for.

 

Question 4: Where do I already have influence?

Often, attorneys’ influence comes from the area in which they excel. While word-of-mouth had been a powerful tool in building business, the internet has changed how people do research and access information. People now use the internet to get the word out. Whether it’s Google searches, websites, reviews, social media, mobile phones or otherwise, the internet is changing the way law firms reach potential clients. If you feel you’re not as influential as you used to be in your practice area, it could be the result of how marketing is changing – not necessarily that your ability to influence has changed. You may just need to re-examine which channels will deliver your message most effectively rather than changing your message.

One last question that attorneys may want to ask themselves when they’ve narrowed down their practice focus is, “How often am I contributing to my law firm’s blog or website?”

Now that many people consult the internet when it comes time to do research, attorneys can gain influence through the regular addition of high-quality content to their law firm’s blog or website. By providing web visitors with detailed information that addresses the questions they have about their case or the law altogether, attorneys can increase their engagement with potential clients while building trust and authority through content creation.

 

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Dan Jaffe
Dan Jaffe
Dan Jaffe is an attorney, and is the CEO of LawLytics, a technology company that provides advanced marketing services to lawyers. Dan built and sold two successful law practices over 10 years before going into technology full-time. He has tried more than 100 cases to verdict, and enjoys teaching lawyers how to build their law practices into appreciating assets using the internet.

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