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The Lazy Person’s Guide to Exercise

The Lazy Person’s Guide to Exercise

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The Lazy Person’s Guide to Exercise

Does your day consist of hours of sitting? Does the thought of going to the gym sound about as appealing as a root canal? You are not alone. In fact, you are a part of the silent majority who is turned off by overly fit men and women telling you how easy it is to get in shape.

Getting in shape is easy if you have the time. You could prepare healthy meals and spend an hour or two exercising if you weren’t working sixty hours a week. But you are working sixty hours a week. You may be juggling work with a family.

You are not lazy; you are busy, really busy. However, your body doesn’t care if you have neither the time nor the inclination to get up and get going. It will respond to your sedate lifestyle with slow atrophy, a compromised immune system and even premature death. Movement and basic exercise are keys to a healthier, longer life. Don’t have the time? Make the time. Here are a few ideas to get motivated to exercise.

Motivators

7 Ways to Motivate to Exercise

  1. Bring your workout clothes to work. The odds of exercising after you come home are slight. The couch, the kitchen, the family beckon. Bring your clothes to work. Exercise at lunch. Or change into your workout clothes at work and stop at a park or gym and exercise before you get home. Make it easier and you will improve your chances of exercising.
  2. Schedule your workout. Don’t leave exercise to chance. Make it as important as your other commitments and add it to your calendar. Twenty to thirty minutes a day is enough to improve your fitness and health. Place the workout in your calendar so you don’t schedule other business where your exercise goes.
  3. Cut your workout in half. Driven people tend to go until it hurts. Inevitably, they do hurt, or they burnout. Instead of the hardcore one hour routine, cut the time in half and go for a thirty minute workout. You will still get the basic benefits from the routine and you lower your risk of injury or fatigue.
  4. Find a workout partner. Make exercise a team effort. Find a friend, coworker, or family member to join you. Make a time commitment with someone and you are less likely to let them down.
  5. Join a team. Call your local parks and recreation organization and find a team sport to play. Basketball, volleyball and soccer will try your fitness. The games will test your strength and endurance and may inspire you to exercise on your off time.
  6. Change routines. It is easy to get into a rut where exercise becomes more dreaded than work. Weeks or even years of repetition can be boring. Add a twist to your current workout or do something completely different. Take up swimming or try a spin class instead of running. Try aerobics in the park or go to an indoor rock gym instead of lifting at the gym. Experiment!
  7. Set a goal. You are good at focusing on an objective until you reach it. Try to lose a pound a week for the next ten weeks. Work up to ten pull-ups over the next two months. Measure your waist and try to lose four inches in six months. Find a half-marathon or an obstacle race like the Tough Mudder and work toward completing it. Write down your goal and the steps it takes to reach it. Track your progress.

Except for avid exercisers, finding the time to workout may require work. It is easy to skip because the health consequences of a sedentary lifestyle are slow and subtle. It will be easy to skip because your time is filled with immediate deadlines that don’t care about your long-term health. Make your health a priority and take the time to exercise. Use these tips or any others you find to stay motivated to be fit.

About the Author

Gregg Ghelfi is a reformed lawyer who founded the Fit in the Middle weight loss program with the goal of helping people lose weight and become healthier. He started his journey after losing twenty pounds from a combination of fitness and nutrition.

To gain a deeper understanding of the subject he researched and wrote a book on Metabolic Syndrome and obesity. It is a narrative about a person who discovers he has Metabolic Syndrome.  With the help of friends he finds out how he can improve his health by losing weight through fitness and nutrition.

 

Gregg Ghelfi
Gregg Ghelfi

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